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Field Sobriety Tests DUI/DWI Online Case Evaluation
DUI/DWI Online Case Evaluation

Field Sobriety Tests:
Standardized and Non-Standardized

If a driver is pulled over on a routine drunk driving stop and the police officer suspects intoxication, field sobriety tests may be conducted. The driver must perform simple physical or cognitive tests to determine sobriety. The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration (NHTSA) guidelines were set up to help make these tests more accurate. They are now called ‘standardized field sobriety tests.’ You can learn extensive knowledge about this specific test by contacting an experienced DUI/DWI lawyer.


The tests are:

the one-leg stand

walk and turn, and

horizontal gaze nystagmus test.

Officers may, however, also administer non-standardized tests, which might include:

stand with feet together and tip the head backwards

count the number of fingers that the officer raises

recite the alphabet or a portion of it

count backwards


Rhomberg stationary balance test: the driver stands, feet together, and leans the head back to look up at the sky while holding their arms out to the side

finger-to-nose: this requires the driver might to close his or her eyes and bring the finger around to touch the nose

hand-pat test: the driver is asked to extend a hand in front, palm upwards. The other hand is then placed on top of the first hand, palm downwards. The driver then ‘pats’ the lower hand with the upper hand by rotating it, so that first the lower hand is patted with the palm of the upper hand and then with the back of the upper hand.

In most states if a driver is suspected of DUI driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, some form of chemical test, such as breath, blood, or urine testing is required. While these tests are technically voluntary, refusal carries a possible penalty such as suspension of driving privileges. A Breathalyzer unit may be used, which is a small hand-held device that measures the driver’s blood-alcohol concentration (BAC). This may be done roadside, at the detainment center, or at a hospital. Blood or urine tests can also be done at a hospital. It is important at this time to contact an expereinced DUI lawyer for you case.

States/Abbreviations
AK Alaska LA Louisiana OH Ohio
AL Alabama MA Massachusetts OK Oklahoma
AR Arkansas MD Maryland OR Oregon
AZ Arizona ME Maine PA Pennsylvania
CA California MI Michigan RI Rhode Island
CO Colorado MN Minnesota SC South Carolina
CT Connecticut MO Missouri SD South Dakota
DE Delaware MS Mississippi TN Tennessee
FL Florida MT Montana TX Texas
GA Georgia NC North Carolina UT Utah
HI Hawaii ND North Dakota VT Vermont
IA Iowa NE Nebraska VA Virginia
ID Idaho NH New Hampshire WA Washington State
IL Illinois NJ New Jersey WI Wisconsin
IN Indiana NM New Mexico WV West Virginia
KS Kansas NV Nevada WY Wyoming
KY Kentucky NY New York DC Washington DC

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